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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 734 (some duplicates have been removed)
were not prepared for that. ongoing litigation. it was constantly, election administration was constantly embattled in a court. courts would intervene, state supreme court would make an emergency decision that secretary of state would decide whether to appeal the decision. it caused a lot of inconsistency and uneasiness going into the election not knowing how our provisional ballot would be counted, not knowing if it was a poll worker's responsibility or the voter's responsibility to fill out the provisional envelope, not knowing if we would have extended hours or weekend hours, preparing all that transcended into our budget, transcended into issues, do we have additional parking, do we get more temporaries, do we open in house voting stations, all contingent on the turnout. that would be at the board based on those decisions. in litigation, out comes by the secretary of state and other interested parties. early voting became a hot-button issue in ohio. that is one event. recommendations as an election administrator, the need to -- for consistent uniformity across the state
roosevelt was elected to president of the united states and became known among many things as the conservation president. it was his vision as president that jumpstarted the preservation movement in this country and gather here today we continue on with the effort to develop public policy that promotes the same ideals as tr did long ago. i have the privilege of being able to absorb what roosevelt experienced as i walk on the very same lands and see the same views he did so long ago. it was my time as governor of north dakota for a saturday to understand the public policy can be used to nudge along the same ideals and help conserve the foundations of our country. when i shared the western governors association, the group of 18 states goes from the country west, very involved in resource issues, we were shepherding the grand canyon visibility study. i was shocked when a regional epa administrator can then and was promoting the idea that north dakota should clean up the air better. i pointed out north dakota was the first state to meet the clean air standards, i was mining and
were on the ground during the 2012 elections discuss how volunteers and run voting precincts with long lines, people showing up at the rahm polling place, and other issues. the event was hosted by the elections commission, which was established in reaction to the 2000 presidential election. this is 90 minutes. >> good morning, everyone. my name is a house miller. i am the director and chief operating officer of the elections commission. i want to thank you for being with us today. i wanted to care panelists. -- to thank our panelists. we're having a discussion on the 2012 elections, with -- and with the group we have gathered, we will be able to accomplish this easily and i want to inform the audience watching that we have an actor -- active twitter account that will be able to respond to questions. #beready2012. we have four panels of some of the representative cross-section of election workers, administrators, and research advocates as well as state and local election officials. in short, here to discuss the 2012 presidential election are observers of elections and those who monitor
this spring. >> it is election time in germany and the chancellor's competition's popularity plunges. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> hollande has announced the french troops have gone on an intervention in mali. this came a request for help out to the west african's country's president. >> they're continuing their drive southward. they already control two-thirds of the former french colony. >> they are on advance. they are now threatening to take this out as well. they are reported to have overrun the strategically important town in central mali. the army has so far been unable to recapture it. as the year grew that they could establish a safe haven for as long as the militants, there was growing pressure for assistance and now france has started military operations. >> french army forces gave their support this afternoon to units in mali to fight against terrorist elements. >> so far, the german government is holding back. >> a military solution alone will not solve the problem in mali. we must therefore intensify political efforts. >> in german
to be done about it. >> more afghans thought the election was -- had been very corrupt and had been very satisfied with the result. so they can hold both concepts that are the media, which seems able to do. we recently did a study assumes to press against any and embarrass perspective. we looked at 20 post conflict read election conflicts, peacekeeping and peace enforcement efforts, the biggest fear -- the big enforcement efforts. the monthly smaller u. n ones and a dozen or more other places. we evaluated them on and at the of places. also, did they approach of the democratization and freedom house chorus to rank them. did they produce of the government, we used indices and they rick every government in the world. did the economy expanded? did did the citizens improved and the nearly use the human development index which looks of both levels of in, but also education and health and other criteria. in democratization, afghanistan did not pass the test. that is definitely a failure. it was about the metal in terms of how much of it was democratized. but in to a government effectiveness, i
been active in democratic circles. she was the national director for howard dean's 24 -- 2004 election. she helped to unseat an 18 year republican incumbent. stephanie also managed the campaign of senator frank and i and minnesota. she defeated norm coleman, correct? she is a graduate of c-span.o [indiscernible] university in minnesota. she has a lot to say and then we will field questions from all of you. thank you, stephanie. >> thank you all so much for coming out. good morning. again, my name is stephanie schriock, president of emily's list. as mentioned, i grew up in butte, montana, where my heart and soul still reside. special thanks to the national press club for setting the solemn. it really is an honor for me to be here today. for those of you who do not know as much about emily's list, emily's list has been around for 27 years. we are solely committed to electing pro-choice democratic women to office up and down the ballot across the country. as mentioned, we had a good election cycle in 2012. two years before that, and would save like most folks, i was ready to see the 112th
of the obama administration with david axelrod, the man most responsible for the election of the president in two successive political campaigns. >> in fact, when we were going over the jokes there was one joke about tim pawlenty, it was poor tim pawlenty, he has such promise except for that unfortunate middle dame bin laden. he said that is so hackneyed, he said in retrospect that is so yesterday. let's take that out. and then the next night when i heard about the raid, i thought my god, he knew when he was sitting there that he had made this decision. he went and performed a brilliantly that night at the white house correspondent dinner, not a trace of anxiety, though he must have felt it. and you know that is an important quality in a prident of the united states, to be able to make decisions on the basis of the best information you have and live with those decisions. >> rose: david axelrod for the hour next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: david axelro
is election day, and campaigning and elections make for uncompromising mind is that you stand on your principles and mobilize the base and to roll in and endless amounts of money. the 24/7 news cycle covers politics if it is a race and the horses are on steroids and it is all the money coming in on the campaign, so what we mean by the uncompromised mind set is a mindset that is geared towards elections and not towards governing. >> president gutmann, you write that you and your co-author dennis johnson as we observe the changing scene in american politics we came to believe the general problem could be addressed by concentrating on a particular institution the united states congress. why is that? >> well, if you want to see the problem with the uncompromised might set look no further than the congress, the 112 congress in washington. gridlock nothing gets passed. the least legislation in the last 50 years, and why? because everybody is campaigning all the time. there is very little relationship across the aisle, and we went out to the brink of the debt ceiling crisis before compromise
elect and defeat anti-choice politicians and elect pro choice politicians to stop this nonsense that we're seeing both at the state level and federal level. >> jennifer: the last abortion clinic in mississippi is on the verge of shutting down, because state lawmakers have made the requirements for it to operate so onerous, and the governor said last week my goal of course is to shut it down. so what does roe v. wade mean if states can do this? >> it's no longer ago the legality of it and access to care that women seek. what is sad about these politicians is that they don't believe that women can make this decision with their family and their doctors. they believe that politicians should make these decisions. so women men, and families have to say enough. state out of our business and we have connect the personal to the political, and until states elect governors and legislators that are going to advance pro choice values, we're going to see this kind of activity. fundamentally elections matter. >> jennifer: right and in the off years often democrats do not com
the president was making his last campaign speech this year, late at night on the eve of the election. i will be thinking about the journey that we've taken together. we, you know, i met barack obama 20 years ago. and we've been working together now for ten. and in a sense we came together at a time when we both were going through a kind of midlife professional crisis. he wondering whether he should continue in politics, me wondering whether i wanted to continue as a consultant because i felt it was becoming so hard edged and cynical. and i said to him after the election, i said he gave me my idealism become and i'm really grateful for that. so i will be thinking about the journey we took together. >> rose: he is an idealistic man. >> i believe he is. he's pragmatic. you know, i think he's very, very pragmatic. and that's a great quality in a very complicated worldment but he's in public life for a reason. charlie, the world separates-- world politics separates into two categories. the people without go into it because they want to be something. and the people without go into it because
the past four years, and into the recent election, the issue of health care has been at the center of our nation's great policy debates with implications beyond the health care industry packing our large -- impacting our larger fiscal policy and social concerns. we are fortunate to have with us today mr. brussard to share insights on the developing policy. prior to joining humana in 2011, he was an executive with the corporation, and before that, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. with that background, mr. brussard brings to the podium today a broad perspective on the health care issues facing the country. he has an undergraduate degree from texas texas a&m, and mba fm university of houston. we look forward to your comments today on this very important topic. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you, thank you, everyone. [applause] >> well, thank you, and i really appreciate the opportunity to address each one of you. as we talk today, our nation is actually wrestling with one of the largest issues probably in a lo
'm not asking anyone else to write any checks until i hear something that makes sense to me. since the election there have been a lot of gatherings and meetings among those who are active in raising money. the question is are we united in drying that up from the people i have talked to? the answer is yes. krystal ball, when you have lost the socialites, i believe the republicans have nothing left to lose. >> well, it -- >> what else is there? this is rock bottom? >> it looks pretty bleak. >> a hack, fundraiser. >> she had strong words there, well, i was looking back at the analysis "the washington post" did last summer regarding the republican party, and the sort of old republicans which i assume she is, fiscally conservative, typically northeastern, typically well off still make up about 22% of the party. so a decent chunk of the party. and what georgeette there shows, they make up a certain amount of the funding base which is why they have had a lock on the republican party. and the innovation for the growth of the tea party is their ability to have larger scale donor movements, smaller dolla
will grow, there will be more elections. there will be more institutional reform. there will be a better government but afghanistan will continue to face problems, there may be violence and there might be other challenges as we move forward but the speed of progress will move and will not stop. will afghanistan remember the united states as a country that helped or a country that did not help? definitely afghanistan will remember the united states as a country that helped. definitely afghanistan will remember that it was the u.s. assistance that brought so much to afghanistan. who will forget the less pleasant aspect ours relationship and we will move forward in the gratitude of the help that the united states has provided to afghanistan and also our other neighbors. but from today as we move forward will this relationship be a emotional as it was at time as you have heard in the past many years? will this relationship billion more mature? this relationship has already grown mature. we recognize the united states interest and afghanistan and the region and the united states recognizes th
this fight just like he won the election. just like he won the debate over raising taxes on the rich. and the american people are behind him. a new poll shows 52% approve of the president's handling of the fiscal cliff deal that raised taxes on the wealthy just 31% support speaker boehner. 57% say president obama got more of what he wanted. just 20% say that about the gop. republicans may not be good at a lot of things, but i do think they can read the poll numbers. they know their approach isn't working which is why gop leaders have begun to waffle on the party's threat not to raise the debt limit. >> we have to use whatever leverage we have. and there are some examples of leverage can coming along. the debt ceiling is one of them. that hopefully would get the president engaged. >> hopefully? whatever leverage we have? doesn't sound like a guy who's confident to me. and john boehner's in the same tight spot. the wall street journal says that boehner thinks that that bill is just one point of leverage. he says he hedges by noting that it is not the ultimate leverage. when a politicia
. and we also just had a little thing called an election. remember that? you know, when just over a month ago, the country rejected republican ideology. but the gop hasn't learned a thing. they're threatening a government shultdown. voting against disaster relief, pushing radical anti-abortion measures. they might actually be funny if they weren't so contemptible. >>> with me now, bob schram, a democratic strategist and columnist for "the daily beast" and abbyhuffington. >>> can the gop learn the chris christie lesson? or are they drinksiing too much from the tea party? >> he's conceivably a very strong candidate for them in 20167. but increasingly, i think he can't be nominated. it's not just that he embraced or worked with the hurricane, it's not just that he called john boehner to account for denying hurricane relief. it's that he uses that word compromise. he believes in governing. and he'd have to run in a party whose primary voters think the first qualification to the presidency is that you hate the dwovt. so i think he's a lock for reelection, i think he's a way forward and i think
elected to not do things as opposed to do things? >> i refer to the tea party class of the congress, they believe they will do precisely what they were elected to do, which is to roll back all obama initiatives and cut spending a lot of them thought that the debt ceiling should not be increased. basically they believe that their job is to obstruct barack obama and then once there is a republican president in place, to have a better business climate with more deregulation or the funding of programs that have never quite been near and dear to them. yes, i think they do believe that. flashing forward a little bit, we have that fiasco of 2011. when we were taken to the brink of a fiscal cliff what we were about to see again, the thinking on the part of the house republicans leadership was maybe our tea party question will realize that compromise is not such a bad thing. the opposite occurred. they went home and the people tend to be the activists of their party and those people tend to be the tea party and they were the ones screaming and asking why did you accept a deal? there have bee
. that the president of the united states, elected to lead the country, is so reluctant to engage on the most important issue regarding our future. >> but you understand what the president told me last week and other democrats have said, the republicans had a chance to say yes to a number of things, in addition to the trillion dollars of spending cuts that were en80ed as part of the budget control act of last year. they could have had additional cuts in entitlement programs if you had agreed before you did it in this temporary measure. going back to the summer of 2011, the president said to all of you republican leaders, if you didn't have such a hard time saying yes to me as president we could have solved some of these issues why. is he off base about that? >> you can relitigate the past if you want to. where we are now is we have resolved the revenue issue, and the question is, what are we going to do about spending? i wish the president would lead us in this discussion, rather than putting himself in a position of having to be dragged kicking and screaming to the table to discuss the single biggest
on an open door here. >> yeah. >> and it is legacy material. he won re-election on one of only eight presidents to win two terms by 51% of the popular vote. what does he use that mandate for? also -- >> that's your question. when are you going to do what you got there to do? stop worry being getting there again. >> the presidents don't always just follow public opinion, they have to shape public opinion. >> can i ask you -- okay. i'm a suburbanite city mouse. i generally have lived in suburban areaings, but i don't know why you need a gun show. i mean, if you want to buy a gun, you go to a dealer. why do you have to have a show? why does it have to be a big hotel opens its doors to a bunch of gun salesmen and people -- >> well -- >> why do you have to have a gun show? >> far be it from me to comment in depth on gun culture but i do think it's fun. gun shows are fun. it's like auto shows. >> you walk out with -- >> if you have the universal background check that the governor is talking about, then fine. the problem with gun shows is they're used as a huge loophole to sell a lot of unr
was president of mexico's federal electric institute during the 2006 elections. director general of the mexico based consultancy. senior advisor to the americas program. he is the author of a new book -- [speaking spanish] this is really the basis for understanding why some of the reforms are going on today, and by political parties are taking on a different direction. he is an economist in residence at the school of international service american university. he did his doctoral work at the university of chicago, and was a top economic diplomat in washington at the time of the naphtha negotiations. he was also chief of staff to the governor of the bank of mexico. more recently represented mexico during the task of leading up to the negotiations leading up to the u.s.-mexico initiative. he has been president of a number of key inflection points .uring u.s.-mexica he has served as ambassador to mexico and assistant secretary of state for western hemisphere affairs. is an author as well. remember his fabulous book, "the u.s. and mexico." he is now a senior counselor with the common group. -- cohe
i wasn't elected to come here just to stand in the way of everything. there are republicans who want to do serious things. on debt. on immigration. they know that the party has a huge problem with hispanics that they have to fix. >> and the other flip side of this is you've been hearing some paranoia from republicans is another way you can crack the republican party or split them is by forcing them to take those things like taxes, and then perhaps leading to a primary challenge for those republicans who voted in favor of higher taxes. chris: somebody on the hard right then? >> as we saw in recent elections democrats have a pretty good track record in general elections against some of these fringe candidates. chris: well said. >> chuck hagel. big discussions. unlike with susan rice where she hung fire for weeks and was dropped, or she dropped herself, this time he stuck with hagel after all the heat against him on -- some from the gays and the left and the neo-cons and where is he heading? put a guy out there in your face as howard said? >> he thinks that he can win. first of all it w
and persons of color, especially after women voters secured his victory in last fall's election. although president obama wanted to nominate susan rice as secretary of state to replace hillary clinton, so far he's appointed men to head up the departments of state, treasury, and defense. and the high-profile position of cia director also went to a male. long time friend of this show, h,lda salis surprised everyone by announcing her resignation this week. do would care how many women and women of color in the cabinet. >> the diversity of this nation. this is a president that said that that is important to him, he's lived up to it i believe he will do it in terms of his second. >> i think mitt romney has an opportunity to bring over his binder of women and hand it over to president obama which we've heard has had hostile environment in the white house. >> i think the bottom line is, he did fairly good job the first time, he hasn't delivered yet. he needs to. diversity at the highest level of government is going to deliver better results and better electoral and outcomes, what is he waiting f
of -- by december 2011, there was a number of elections in iraq which was to the good, but iraq had not fully become a democracy in the sense there was not a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led to another prime minister. that's a true test of a democracy is whether there's not merely an election, and russia has elections, i serve there, but whether there's an election, another candidate wins, and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq is in the at that milestone yet. what we had in december 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but, i think, unfortunately, the situation in iraq has deteriorated politically over the past year, and, also, iraq has been less aligned with american interests and more aligned with actually iranian interests in as far as the serian conflict is concerned. >> host: phone lines open now so feel free. democrats 202-585-3880, and independents, 202-585-3882. let us know if you received in iraq as well, and your thoughts on what's happening now. phone lines open. i want to go back to the political situation in iraq. talk about prime minister
is stephanie schriock. she is the president of emily's list. guest: this election was a mandate for women's leadership across the country. an historic number of women were sworn in it to congress last week. this election was also about women voters and women's issues, some of which i would prefer not having a debate about. we will see more and more women stepping up to run. host: 20 senators, 81 representatives in 2013. what issues to the brink when it comes to women's issues? guest: we have never had 20 women in the u.s. senate. it is a great benchmark to hit. i would like to see it at 50. we're adding diversity to the debate. we will end up with policies that are best for our committees. these women are bringing different perspectives on all sorts of issues including economics, education, the environment. i think you'll see a lot of different thoughts and ideas on how to get things done and how to find compromise. host: how does a play out with women in leadership roles? guest: we have a new number of women serving on committees and shares. barbara mikulski is the first women's chair of
, involving people who are local democratic elected officials, union lerdz, local party officials, and grassroots activists beloved in the communities, and we would e-mail districts of those who support benefit cuts, and say, hey, who wants to run for congress? >> host: have you launched that warning to some members of congress? >> we have. we have launched it publicly, and we have a more generic sense saying it's a warning. we want to be transparent, and, honestly, we don't yearn for the war on the left. it's ironic for us, me, woke up in 2008 and thought what can i do today to get barack obama elected president. having fight a democratic president on social security and just to be clear, he put -- he publicly admitted he put social security benefit cuts on the table. that is not a position i want to be in. that's not what i worked for in 2008, and what some of the other people worked for >> host: worked for it in 2012? regretting working for the president? >> our organization prioritized congress in 2012. the number one candidate was elizabeth warren calling out the ig and big w
and have a good day. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> a record number of women were elected to the u.s. u.s. house and senate in november. there are now more women in the u.s. u.s. senate. conversation women candidates who ran for office in 2012. this 35 minute event is hosted by emily's list which is a political action committee that supports pro-choice women candidates running for congress and governor. >> the national press club here and we are privileged to have stephanie schriock, the president of emily's list to be here today. as they well should after their spectacular when in the last presidential election. stephanie has been very active in democratic circles. she was national finance director for howard dean's 2004 election. she then helped the united states senator john -- unseat an 18-year-old incumbent in the state of montana. stephanie also managed the campaign of senator franken in minnesota and she defeated norm colman. correct? she is a graduate of man caught a state university in minnesota and she grew up in montana. here is stephanie, the president of emily's list w
round of elections? solvation does not lie with shutting down the federal government. it has been demonstrated time and time again in a well, the president did win in my district. think what the american public voted for was a stalemate. because they wanted to have some accountability and traparency. >> i agree with that. i'm talking about the power of the house of representatives himself. >> i think that's why we lost this last one. we were progressive. we weren't in front of the issues and we didn't have a discussion with the american peop. i think we do our best work to open that up to all the great ideas on the floor in regular order and put it out there to the american people. 71% of the american people and spending cuts. lou: your leadership chose to go one-on-one with the president. and speaker boehner says he's not going to do that again. he has moved to regular order. you're on the right in the house of representatives, republicans were insisting upon that all along. he has changed his position and the american people have to be slightly perplexed that now the only way to
and get a head start in to a year full of budget fights. >> right. especially an election and very critical of the other side's lack of diversity. valerie jarrett's leg was in night's photo. >> that's important. >> are we going to hear pushback on this nomination at all from the left? lew has less wall street -- fewer wall street ties than geithner an he was a coo at citigroup. he said during the 2010 crisis he didn't believe financial deregulation was a proximate cause of the crisis. will we see pushback from the left on this confirmation? >> we saw barney sanders of vermont say he's against the nomination but there's another problem, too. house republicans who are the only republicans in control in town really almost despise jack lew, do not see him as an honest broker and someone to work with and a story on politico tomorrow i'm working on puts a nail in the coffin on tax reform and republicans trying to jump start for a long time and problems practically with house republicans and negotiating budget deals, with jack lew. i mean, john boehner doesn't want him in the room negotia
to get his picks into his cabinet. and coming after losing the presidential election, losing seats in the house and senate, to democrats, the republicans have been looking for a way to ding the president. they were able to ding him by denying him the choice of susan rice, the u.n. ambassador to be the president's next secretary of state. they view going after chuck hagel as being one more notch in this crazy war against the president when a lot of people in the country want congress to focus not so much on chuck hagel as they want them to focus on what's happening with sequester and the budget and debt ceiling and other things that have direct impacts on people's lives. from a policy standpoint, does this come down to bush era neocon, that reminds them that he opposed the war. >> he did oppose the surge. for republicans this is about somebody whom they disagree with on policy and never liked that much in the senate because he wasn't the kind of senator that had a lot of friends, that played the relationship game at a high level. and so it's not like he has solid friendships that ca
election. but most of them, honestly, were from the republican primaries. come on. very few of the laugh out loud moments from the last election involved president obama himself telling a laugh out loud deadpan joke. but it did happen once. >> i think governor romney maybe hasn't spent enough time looking at how our military works. you mentioned the navy, for example, and that we have fewer ships than we did in 1916. well, governor, we also have fewer horses and bayonets because the nature of our military's changed. we have these things called aircraft carriers where planes land on them. we have ships that go underwater. nuclear submarines. >> ships that go underwater. after that moment in the third presidential debate last year there was a brief but fascinating flurry of really earnest fact checking about the question of whether or not there really are fewer bayonets in the u.s. military right now. remember? tmz had an exclusive inside scoop on outrage from the bayonet community. "we are not obsolete." in fact, the last famous bayonet charge in american history was in 1951 during the ko
? and are you completely committed to stepping down as president of the elections next year? >> i want us to remember why we went to afghanistan. we went into afghanistan because 3,000 americans were viciously murdered. by a terrorist organization that was operating openly and at the invitation of those who were then ruling afghanistan. it was absolutely the right thing to do for us to go after that organization. to go after the host government that had aided and abetted or at least allowed for these attacks to take place. and because of the heroic work of our men and women in uniform, and because of the cooperation and sacrifices of afghans who had also been brutalized by that then-host government, we achieved our central goal. which is or have come very close to achieving our central goal, which is to decompass tate al qaeda. to dismantle them. to make sure that they can't attack us again. and everything that we've done over the last ten years, from the prospective of the u.s. national security interests, have been focused on that aim. and at the end of this conflict, we are going to be
decision in the wake of president obama's re-election. the republican party is divided. that's being isolated and ignored by the right wingers. that's a problem for the gop. that southern dominance may sentence the entire party to irrelevance. >>> conservative ideologues are itching for another fight with president obama, this time saying they may shut down the government altogether or risk a credit catastrophe. could somebody remind these guys who won the election, again. >>> plus, the nra has made its position clear. the answer to gun violence, more guns. we have evidence that posting armed guards everywhere has the exact opposite effect. the latest battle lines as the obama administration moves to curb the availability of assault weapons. >>> let me finish with why this nomination of chuck hagel should be given a solid, solid chance, and this is "hardball," the place for politics, >>> hillary clinton is back at work at the state department. this morning she chaired the weekly meeting of the department's leadership team, and one thing on the agenda will be testifying on capitol hil
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 734 (some duplicates have been removed)